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Grand Teton

Grand Teton National Park may be smaller and less visited than its famous neighbor to the north, Yellowstone, but for most visitors it more than holds its own. The stunningly rugged mountains, clear lakes, and abundant wildlife make this a peaceful and unforgettable place to spend a couple of days.

Named after Grand Teton, the tallest mountain in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park is full of the country’s most magnificent mountain peaks. These immense, jagged peaks are like no others in North America, and present postcard perfect photo opportunities when they cast their reflection on the Park’s still and peaceful lakes. And what better way to experience this than by canoe, on beautiful Jenny Lake; a highlight of your Grand Teton vacation.

Grand Teton National Park is full of hiking trails that you and your family can enjoy together. In fact, nearly 200 miles of trails exist here, leading you to some of the country’s most scenic vistas. You can cover a lot of ground on foot in a day, or let us book a half day mountain bike tour for you instead.

Wildlife is in abundance in Grand Teton National Park, so keep your eyes peeled and your camera at the ready. Look to the skies as well as the land and the water, as this is home to Golden Eagles, Bald Eagles, and around 300 other species of birds. One of the best times to see wildlife is in the early evening as the animals venture out for feeding.

Quick Facts
  •  The Grand Tetons ended up with this name by mistake when a mapping blunder meant that the mountains were mistaken for some hills near the town of Arco, Idaho.
  •  Though Grand Teton National Park has a semi-arid mountain climate, snow is common between November and April and temperatures can be cold. The coldest temperature ever recorded here was a numbing -63F (-52.8C). Brrrr.